Over the past seven seasons, the characters of “Game of Thrones” have journeyed far and wide – across the Seven Kingdoms and beyond the Wall – in their quest for the Iron Throne. In anticipation of the final season (sigh), HBO launched a global scavenger hunt, “Quest for the Throne,” to see just how far fans would travel to sit on the coveted seat of power – and it was no easy undertaking.  

Six thrones were hidden around the world and the only clues provided were a 360-degree video of the throne and cryptic messages from the #ForTheThrone campaign on the various “Game of Thrones” social handles. Fans worked together via social media – racing to solve the riddles and claim their prize. No joke… they referenced maps of the Aurora Borealis, identified specific land formations and topography, and ultimately set out on foot to locate all six thrones.

Once all six thrones were found… the craziness continued. Fans went to great lengths to have their own moment on the throne. Some chartered helicopters to lead them to the sites and three couples even got engaged on the throne.

Check out the locations of each of the thrones below, how quickly they were found and why each place was chosen:

UK – Puzzlewood, Devon

  • This location was chosen for its stunning forest, referencing the Haunted Forest beyond the Wall where Bran encounters the Children of the Forest and the Three-Eyed-Raven.
  • The throne dropped on March 18 at 10 a.m. ET. Alex Bowring and Thomas Maullin-Sapey were the first fans to claim the throne on March 20 at 7 a.m. ET, two days and nine hours after it went live.

 

 

Sweden – Björkliden

  • The northern lights dance among the landscape, representing the wildfire created by the Mad King Aerys II and used in the battle of Blackwater Bay and in the destruction of the Great Sept of Baelor.
  • The throne dropped on March 20 at 10 a.m. ET. Josefine Wallenå was the first fan to claim the throne on March 21 at 7:51 a.m. ET, one day, nine hours and 51 minutes after it went live.

 

 

Brazil – Beberibe, Ceará

  • This location was selected for the rocky landscape abutting the sea, alluding to Dragonstone, the original seat of House Targaryen in Westeros and the birthplace of Daenerys Targaryen.
  • The throne dropped on March 22 at 10 a.m. ET. Claricia Amaro di Lima was the first fan to claim the throne on March 24 at 4:27 p.m. ET, two days, six hours and 27 minutes after it went live.

 

 

Spain – Castillo de Atienza, Guadalajara

  • This location immediately brings to mind the Tower of Joy, the pivotal location where Jon Snow, son of Rhaegar Targaryen and Lyanna Stark, was born.
  • The throne dropped on March 22 at 10 a.m. ET. Patricia Vaquero Asensio was the first fan to claim the throne on March 22 at 1:04 p.m. ET, three hours and four minutes after it went live.

 

 

Canada – Babcock Seeps, British Columbia

  • This location was chosen to represent one of the most iconic environments in Westeros – the wintery landscape of the North, the Wall and the Land of Always Winter.
  • The throne dropped on March 25 at 10 a.m. ET. Birgit Sharman was the first fan to claim the throne on March 26 at 5:44 p.m. ET, one day, seven hours and 44 minutes after it went live.

 

 

New York – Fort Totten, Queens

  • This location was selected for the dark and ominous setting of the basement of Kings Landing, where the Mad King stored his destructive wildfire, which Queen Cersei used to destroy the Great Sept of Baelor.
  • The throne dropped on March 28 at 10 a.m. ET. Melanie Joaquín was the first fan to claim the throne on March 28 at 10:15 a.m. ET, 15 minutes after the throne going live – holding the record for the shortest time to find the throne.

 

Don’t miss the “Game of Thrones” final season premiere this Sunday, April 14 at 9 p.m. ET.